Saturday, August 23, 2014

While at the Seaside Sprint...

Philippe Marschall had an interesting problem to think about... suppose you have a dictionary with string keys, and that you make sure the keys are uppercase.  Alas, when the code receives queries, it gets lowercase keys.  Fixing this requires sending asUppercase, which takes time.  Can you find a way such that both at: and at:put: can be made to work without sending asUppercase?  Can you do it without creating new classes?

I got a proof of concept to run 2x faster.  From what I hear, the improved code will help speed up HTTP requests.

Exceptions fixed in Squeak, Pharo and Cuis

Martin McClure just integrated the Pharo exceptions fix we worked on during Camp Smalltalk.  I imagine this fix, in 5 slices, should be straightforward to port to Squeak and Cuis.

Update: I ported the Pharo fix to Cuis.

About ESUG 2014

What a lovely conference, I'm glad to be back.  I really enjoyed the talks, you should go to the YouTube playlist and take a look.  Some that come to mind are Eliot Miranda's Spur talk, Clement Bera's talks about adaptive optimization, Tim Rowledge's talk on his work on Scratch, and Boris Shingarov's talk about modern problems for the Smalltalk VM in the IWST track, as well as Yuriy Tymchuk's presentation on Smalldromeda and Alexandre Bergel's Roassal presentation.  This is hardly a fair list though, so please excuse my brevity in favor of ESUG's video playlist.

I am also glad my Retrospective presentation was well received.  The results earned compliments from Tudor Girba.  There were plenty of laughs during the talk, and it was a lot of fun :).

More news to come...

Monday, August 11, 2014

3x+1 over the weekend

You will recall from my previous 3x+1 posts that using

T^n(q2^n + r) = q3^j + T^n(r)

one could build an evaluation matrix for each 0 <= r < 2^n.  For a long time, I had strong circumstantial evidence that the proportion of evaluation matrix rows satisfying T^n(k) > k tended to shrink as n grew.  It's so unsatisfying to merely feel something has to be true...

I am happy now, though.  After reading Concrete Mathematics for several hours, I managed a tentative proof showing the proportion of rows satisfying the growth inequality tends to zero as n goes to infinity.  If you are interested, send me a note --- there is no way I am typesetting that heavy math in this blog post!